PRESIDENTAL WHIM OF TYRANNY: The Japanese-American internment in WWII

PRESIDENTAL WHIM OF TYRANNY: The Japanese-American internment in WWII

PRESIDENTAL WHIM OF TYRANNY: The Japanese-American internment in WWII

On Jan. 14, 1942, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt issued Presidential Proclamation No. 2537, which required Americans of Japanese, German and Italian descent to register with the U.S. Department of Justice. This was a precursor to the imprisonment of people who had committed no crime, based solely on their ancestry.

Those who registered were photographed and fingerprinted and issued a Certificate of Identification for Aliens of Enemy Nationality card. They were required to have the card with them at all times; their movements were restricted; and they were subjected to curfew regulations. They were also required to surrender any cameras and shortwave radios they owned.

Round-up and internment in concentration camps began one month later with the issuance of Executive Order 9066.

Almost everyone has heard of the Japanese-American internment. Almost all the Japanese-Americans on the West coast — some 120,000 in all — were forced to abandon their homes and businesses, incarcerated and transferred to prison camps in California, Wyoming, Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Utah and Arkansas. These included Americans of Japanese descent who had fought for the U.S. in World War I, and some who had enlisted to fight in World War II.

The mass incarceration was carried out despite an Office of Naval Intelligence study’s conclusion that the vast majority of Japanese-Americans posed no threat to national security and that the few who did had already been identified and were in custody or under surveillance.

 

Read full story: http://personalliberty.com/the-japanese-and-german-and-italian-american-...